NBA star James Harden being sued for orchestrating assault, robbery over Facebook post

Houston Rockets All-Star James Harden is being sued for allegedly orchestrating the assault and robbery of Moses Malone Jr. last year.

Malone, the son of NBA Legend Moses Malone, was beaten and robbed of thousands of dollars worth of jewelry outside of a Houston nightclub in June of 2016.

The suit alleges that Harden became upset after Malone made comments about his basketball camp on social media and reportedly paid a group of four men $20,000 to commit the crime in retribution.

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Isaiah Thomas puts on stellar performance on late sister’s birthday, just days after her funeral

Isaiah Thomas, the Boston Celtics’ star point guard, had the game of his life Tuesday night.

In Game 2 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals against the Washington Wizards, Thomas put up 53 points in 44 minutes to lead his team to a thrilling overtime victory.

The Celtics’ point guard, who is listed at 5 foot 9, averaged just under 30 points per game this season. Tuesday night was Thomas’ highest scoring game of his career.

It was an incredible display that has earned comparisons to the likes of Michael Jordan, Allen Iverson and John Havlicek.

The story behind his performance, however, is heartbreaking.

“It’s my sister — happy birthday — she would have been 23 today,” Thomas said after Tuesday’s win. “Everything I do is for her and she’s watching over me.”

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Why do NCAA teams cut down the net after big wins?

If you’ve ever watched the Elite Eight round or championship game of March Madness, you’ve witnessed one of the most storied traditions in all of sports — the cutting of the net.

The champion of each region, and ultimately the champion of the entire tournament, gets to partake in the ritual of cutting the net away from the sport’s iconic orange hoop so players can take a piece of history home with them.

But who came up with that idea?

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History to be made in unexpected NCAA Final Four matchups

Dramatic finishes in the Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight rounds have four regional champions facing off in a historic Final Four the NCAA Tournament has yet to see in years.

Those four teams — Oregon from the Midwest, North Carolina from the South, Gonzaga from the West and South Carolina from the East — will now compete for the chance to play in the NCAA Championship on April 3 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Out of these finalists, North Carolina is the only team to have made it this far in the past 78 years. In fact, the Tar Heels were in the NCAA Championship just last year — though they lost a heartbreaker to Villanova.

Oregon’s last appearance in the Final Four was in 1939, the only year the Ducks went on to win the title. South Carolina and Gonzaga have never made an appearance in this nail-biting round of college basketball in the history of the tournament.

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The worst droughts in the history of the NCAA tournament

Ivy League universities seem to have it all. They each have a rich academic history, incredibly talented students, respected staff and faculty strong reputations. Their esteemed names are recognized worldwide, and for good reason.

Thankfully, there’s one area in which the Ivy League falls short and we mere mortals can take some solace: March Madness.

Some argue the prestige of the Ivy League comes to a screeching halt when the NCAA tournament comes into play. It’s not just that several of the schools have never won the championship, but they remain winless in the most painful of ways — by not even making the tournament for decades at a time.

Think of the pain of the Chicago Cubs who, until last year, had not won a championship in 108 years. No team in March Madness has a streak quite that painful, since the competition itself is only 78 years old, but the iconic Ivies of Harvard, Dartmouth and Yale rank as the top three tournament droughts with some impressive — or disappointing — numbers.

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Stephen Curry shows off never-before-seen moves — and talks family, March Madness and the changing NBA

Growing up, the Golden State Warriors’ Steph Curry wanted to be a combination of NBA legends Reggie Miller and Steve Nash. At 29, the team’s pride and reigning league MVP seems to have come pretty close to having attained that goal already.

Curry, who averages more than 22 points per game over his career (even higher this season), has something neither Miller nor Nash ever secured — an NBA championship.

His success is due largely in part to his dedication to practicing his skills. And now, fans can watch the greatness that is Steph Curry on the court in a brand new way

The point guard partnered with Degree to produce a 360-degree video, showing off his moves and creativity like never before.

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Elite No. 8: The lowest seed to ever win the NCAA Championship

Everybody loves a Cinderella story.

Seasoned March Madness fans know to have at least a few upsets in their bracket. It’s generally safe to pick them early on — a 10 seed over the 7, the occasional 12 seed over a 5 — but as the tournament goes on, those selections become riskier and riskier.

Sometimes, those risks pay off and get you an extra few points in your bracket. Once in a blue moon (read: once in history) an 8-seed wins the whole darn thing and the gamble really pays off.

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The most successful teams in March Madness tournament history

Even those who don’t follow college basketball recognize the big names: Kentucky. Duke. North Carolina. Connecticut. They’re the well-known teams that consistently headline March Madness — and they’re generally a safe bet to pick as a champion in your brackets.

Someone has to be the best, though. In both the men’s and women’s tournament, 11 titles are enough to reign supreme as the most successful schools in the sport’s history.

Enter: the UCLA Bruins and the UConn Huskies.

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Isaiah Thomas sends NBA into a frenzy using just one emoji

Basketball fans are freaking out ahead of the NBA’s trade deadline this Thursday, which is natural. Trade deadlines in any league are sure to bring blockbuster deals as teams either stack up for the playoffs or remortgage their assets in an effort to bolster their future.

Trade rumors are boosted by fans and commentators alike, but what really gets people going is when the players themselves get into it.

Monday night, Boston Celtics All-Star guard Isaiah Thomas added some serious fuel to the fire with one simple tweet:

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Stephen Curry has a strange habit of lying down during major games

Stephen Curry is an NBA Champion. He is a two-time NBA Most Valuable Player and a four-time NBA All-Star. He is heralded as one of the best shooters of all time, from free throws to three-pointers and every clutch moment in between.

He also likes to lie down. Like, a lot.

Okay, every human likes to lie down. We do it every night when we go to sleep — and who doesn’t love sleep? But not all of us do it in the middle of professional basketball games.

Curry’s curious habit has been noticed a few times, most recently during Sunday night’s NBA All-Star Game. He laid himself flat on the ground and covered his head in order to avoid being dunked on by Eastern Conference All-Star Giannis Antetokounmpo.

We get it. Getting dunked on by a 6 foot 11, 220-pound 22-year-old doesn’t sound like a good time. Also, this incident would have just been a funny highlight if it was the only time it happened.

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