Tom Brady, Patriots players team up with Guy Fieri for a good cause — and plenty of food and football

The clouds over Boston couldn’t dampen the spirits of Tom Brady, Guy Fieri or any of the guests at the Cooking with Best Buddies Food and Wine Festival and accompanying football game at Harvard University.

Best Buddies International, a nonprofit organization benefiting those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, kicked off a weekend’s worth of festivities in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Friday evening.

Popular celebrity chef and TV personality Guy Fieri hosted the second annual Guy Cooking with Best Buddies event while New England Patriots quarterback and Super Bowl LI MVP Tom Brady held the Best Buddies Football Challenge flag football game at Harvard Stadium.

The game featured Brady quarterbacking for both teams alongside some of his famous friends, including Massachusetts Congressman Joe Kennedy and Patriots teammates Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola, James White and Dion Lewis.

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The worst droughts in the history of the NCAA tournament

Ivy League universities seem to have it all. They each have a rich academic history, incredibly talented students, respected staff and faculty strong reputations. Their esteemed names are recognized worldwide, and for good reason.

Thankfully, there’s one area in which the Ivy League falls short and we mere mortals can take some solace: March Madness.

Some argue the prestige of the Ivy League comes to a screeching halt when the NCAA tournament comes into play. It’s not just that several of the schools have never won the championship, but they remain winless in the most painful of ways — by not even making the tournament for decades at a time.

Think of the pain of the Chicago Cubs who, until last year, had not won a championship in 108 years. No team in March Madness has a streak quite that painful, since the competition itself is only 78 years old, but the iconic Ivies of Harvard, Dartmouth and Yale rank as the top three tournament droughts with some impressive — or disappointing — numbers.

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